About

Kia ora!

I was introduced to parkour in 2008, the same year I began my undergraduate studies in Sport and Exercise Science at Wintec. This was the kindling of a triune love affair between me, parkour and education; I’ve been training, learning and teaching ever since.

I’m currently at the University of Waikato completing my PhD thesis – Making the Jump: Examining the Development of Parkour in New Zealand.

I’m founding member of the New Zealand Parkour Association (NZ Parkour), current CEO (2013-present) and head coach.

I was also a key contributor in the founding of Parkour Earth, the International Federation for Parkour/Freerunning/Art du Déplacement and am an elected director on the transitional board.

While I’m interested in all things parkour, I’m particularly interested in globalisation, health and safety reform, coaching, physical education, public policy, emotional geography, and sociology.

I think parkour is serious fun.

NOTE: The thoughts expressed on this website are my own and not that of the organisations I am part of or relate to (i.e. University of Waikato, NZ Parkour, Parkour Earth).

Media

At TEDx Ruakura 2016 my performance “Familiarity Breeds Confidence”, explored the ways in which we can incorporate the philosophies and training principles of parkour into our daily lives whether we’re practitioners or not.

My friends from Flat Thirteen came and talked to me in 2013 about my role with NZ Parkour, my training focus and other ventures.

A short feature on parkour while exploring Hamilton city training spots in 2012 for NZ Parkour’s “What is Parkour?” series, made by my friends at Plural Films.

Me as “Le Traceur”, #15 on the Waikato Times “Waikato 100” in 2012

Press

 

Blog Post “Why we need to fight FIG: Lessons from other action sports” Referenced in Vice Sports Article – “How Gymnastics Is Trying To Take Over Parkour And Make It An Olympic Sport” (July 2017)

https://sports.vice.com/en_ca/article/qvp395/how-gymnastics-is-trying-to-take-over-parkour-and-make-it-an-olympic-sport

 

Blog Post “Why we need to fight FIG: Lessons from other action sports” Republished by MÜV Magazine (May 2017)

http://muvmag.com/lessons-from-other-action-sports/

 

Q & A with Obstacle Racers NZ (February 2017)

http://www.obstacleracersnz.co.nz/2017/02/25/damien-puddle-nz-parkour-interview/

Talking all things parkour with CapeTalk in South Africa (November 2016)

My speaker profile for TEDxRuakura: Morphosis (July 2016)

http://tedxruakura.com/damienpuddle/

Front cover of the May issue of the Fitness Journal (2015)

PARKOUR PROFILE: Damien Puddle

Chatting with Aaron from Raglan Community Radio about parkour and some recent Raglan based parkour workshops (September 2015)

 

 

Speaking with Jim Mora on the Radio New Zealand Afternoon Show about parkour and risk (August 2013)

 

Profile on me as “Le Traceur”, #15 in the Waikato Times, “Waikato 100” (February 2012)

 

Research

Making the Jump: Examining the Development of Parkour in New Zealand (expected to finish in 2019)

Brief: Making the Jump is the working title of my PhD thesis in the Sociology of Action Sport at the University of Waikato.

Parkour in Education – download article

Citation: Puddle, Damien. (2015). Parkour in education. New Zealand Physical Educator, 48(3), 12.

Brief: I talk about how parkour is making inroads into the New Zealand Physical Education Curriculum and provide a few insights as to why this seems to be the case.

 

Ground reaction forces and loading rates associated with parkour and traditional drop-landing techniques (Published in 2013) – view infographicdownload article

Citation: Damien L. Puddle, & Peter S. Maulder. (2013). Ground reaction forces and loading rates associated with parkour and traditional drop landing techniques. Journal of Sports Science and Medicine, 12(1), 122-129.

Brief: Are parkour landings more valuable (i.e. safer) than traditional landing techniques for parkour practitioners? A sample of parkour practitioners used traditional and parkour (precision and roll) landing techniques from a fixed height to measure the differences in impact force, loading rate and time to peak force.

 

Ground reaction forces and loading rates associated with parkour drop-landing techniques from varying heights – download manuscript

Citation: Damien L. Puddle (2011). Ground reaction forces and loading rates associated with parkour drop-landing techniques from varying heights. Unpublished manuscript. Waikato Institute of Technology, Hamilton, New Zealand.

Brief: A follow-up study (from the study above) investigating the same landing techniques but from varying heights that are more applicable to parkour training.

 

Blog

Why we need to fight FIG: Lessons from other action sports

UPDATE #1: I’ve included a video summary of my article for those who would prefer not to read for any reason. Please forgive some verbal hiccups. Follow up any of the details properly in the article below – there are links galore! UPDATE #2: I’ve added SUP (Standup Paddleboarding) to the list (it’s not included in …