Research

Making the Jump: Examining the Development of Parkour in New Zealand (expected to finish in 2019)

Brief: Making the Jump is the working title of my PhD thesis in the Sociology of Action Sport at the University of Waikato.

The glocalization of parkour: a New Zealand/Aotearoa case studydownload article

Citation: Damien Puddle, Belinda Wheaton & Holly Thorpe (2018): The
glocalization of parkour: a New Zealand/Aotearoa case study, Sport in Society, DOI: 10.1080/17430437.2018.1441010

Abstract: Globalization has led to the increased sportization of parkour, one of the world’s newest lifestyle sports. This paper investigates the parkour scene in New Zealand, where attempts to develop and support parkour have resulted in the formation of a national governing body (NGB). Parkour NZ, formed in 2011 by local practitioners and the first NGB for parkour to be registered as a charity, is undergoing increased sportization in both traditional and unique ways. We examine the motivations that inspired its formation, registration as a charity and some of the ways it has negotiated the sportization process while accounting for New Zealand parkour community values. Our case study adds to understandings of glocalization and sportization of informal lifestyle sports, and highlights how parkour practitioner values are negotiated within new organizational spaces.

Parkour in Education – download article

Citation: Puddle, Damien. (2015). Parkour in education. New Zealand Physical Educator, 48(3), 12.

Brief: I talk about how parkour is making inroads into the New Zealand Physical Education Curriculum and provide a few insights as to why this seems to be the case.

 

Ground reaction forces and loading rates associated with parkour and traditional drop-landing techniques (Published in 2013) – view infographicdownload article

Citation: Damien L. Puddle, & Peter S. Maulder. (2013). Ground reaction forces and loading rates associated with parkour and traditional drop landing techniques. Journal of Sports Science and Medicine, 12(1), 122-129.

Brief: Are parkour landings more valuable (i.e. safer) than traditional landing techniques for parkour practitioners? A sample of parkour practitioners used traditional and parkour (precision and roll) landing techniques from a fixed height to measure the differences in impact force, loading rate and time to peak force.

 

Ground reaction forces and loading rates associated with parkour drop-landing techniques from varying heights – download manuscript

Citation: Damien L. Puddle (2011). Ground reaction forces and loading rates associated with parkour drop-landing techniques from varying heights. Unpublished manuscript. Waikato Institute of Technology, Hamilton, New Zealand.

Brief: A follow-up study (from the study above) investigating the same landing techniques but from varying heights that are more applicable to parkour training.